Ribston Pippin apple trees

Ribston Pippin apple tree
  • Pick: Late-season (mid-September)
  • Flowering group: 3
  • Uses: Eat fresh | Cookery 
  • Pollination partners

A particuarly handsome apple, thought to be one of the parents of Cox's Orange Pippin. It has some of the aromatic qualities of that variety when eaten fresh, but is noticeably sharper in flavour - and for this reason is often used in the kitchen as well.

By Victorian times Ribston Pippin was very popular as a late autumn apple, and the Victorian fruit enthusiast Robert Hogg reported that it was in "greatest perfection during November and December".

Ribston Pippin apple trees for sale

Order now for delivery from 18th December

Mature size* Supplied as Price Quantity

Bare-root fruit trees

Large  (3m - 4m after 5-10 years) 1-year - bare-root - MM106 rootstock £18.95
Large  (3m - 4m after 5-10 years) 2-year bush-trained - bare-root - MM106 rootstock £27.95
Large  (3m - 4m after 5-10 years) Half-standard - bare-root - MM106 rootstock £31.95 Sold outalert me
Full size  (5m+ after 5-10 years) 1-year - bare-root - M25 rootstock £18.95
Full size  (5m+ after 5-10 years) Half-standard - bare-root - M25 rootstock £31.95
Full size  (5m+ after 5-10 years) Standard 1.75m - bare-root - M25 rootstock £31.95

Delivery period: Pot-grown trees can be delivered from September onwards. Bare-root trees can be delivered from mid-November onwards. Within those periods you can specify your preferred month of delivery during the checkout process. It is best to order as soon as you can to ensure items are reserved for you.

*Mature size: Height shown is the approximate height of the tree when mature (after 5-10 years), not the height when supplied. See photos of trees as supplied. Actual mature heights may vary considerably dependent on your local conditions and training and pruning regime.

Stock availability: Items showing as 'sold out' will probably be available again next season. Click here to be notified when we get more trees of this variety.

Summary features of Ribston Pippin

Growing

  • Gardening skill: Average?
  • Cropping: Good
  • Fertility: Not self-fertile?
  • Flowering group: 3?
  • Pollinating others: Poor?
  • Ploidy: Triploid?
  • Vigour: Average growth?
  • Bearing regularity: Regular?
  • Fruit bearing: Spur-bearer?
  • Fruit persistence: Normal ripening?
  • Attractive fruit
  • Overall disease resistance: Average?
  • Organic / no-spray culture?
  • Long-lived: Yes?

Uses

Identification

  • Country of origin: United Kingdom
  • Period of origin: 1700 - 1749
  • Fruit colour: Orange flush
  • Leaf colour: Green
  • Popularity: Best sellers?

Climate

  • Temperate climates
  • Mild / damp climates?
  • UK Zone 2 - Northern UK: Yes
  • UK Zone 3 - Southern UK: Yes
  • Planting position: Full sun preferred

Pollination guide for Ribston Pippin

Ribston Pippin is in flowering group 3. Ribston Pippin is a triploid variety and cannot pollinate other varieties. It needs to be pollinated by another tree of a different variety nearby. You can either plant a self-fertile variety (which will pollinate itself and the Ribston Pippin) or you can plant two pollination partners which must each be of different varieties and able to cross-pollinate each other as well as the Ribston Pippin. If you need further advice on this just get in touch. Since it flowers in the middle of the blossom season it can be pollinated by most other apple trees.

How to grow Ribston Pippin apple trees

Ribston Pippin is a tough tree, suitable for growing throughout England and much of Scotland - but it needs a sheltered situation in more northerly gardens and it prefers a drier climate than a wet one if possible.

Historical details

Named after Ribston Hall in North Yorkshire, England, where this variety was first planted in the 18th century. Having been grown in Yorkshire for more than 200 years Ribston Pippin is rightly regarded as a traditional Yorkshire variety, however it was almost certainly brought to Ribston Hall from France.

Botanical name

Malus domestica 'Ribston Pippin'


UK-grown trees All our trees are grown in the UK.