Queen Cox apple trees

Queen Cox apple tree
  • Pick: Mid-season (mid-September)
  • Flowering group: 3
  • Self-fertile
  • Uses: Eat fresh | Cookery | Juicing 
  • Pollination partners

Queen Cox is a variant of the original Cox's Orange Pippin, and is perhaps the best of all the many forms of Cox's Orange Pippin.

The most noticeable difference is a slightly deeper skin colouring, but the fruit-size can also be slightly larger and the texture may be slightly crisper ... although these are nuances and may vary from year to year.

In any case there is no doubt that Queen Cox has all the aromatic qualities associated with Cox's Orange Pippin, and in flavour terms is by any standards a remarkably good apple.

Queen Cox apple trees for sale

Order now for delivery from 24 October (pot-grown) or December (bare-root).

Mature size* Supplied as Price Quantity

Bare-root fruit trees

Small  (1.8m - 2.5m after 5-10 years) 2-year bush-trained - bare-root - M9 rootstock £26.95

Delivery period: Pot-grown trees can be delivered from September onwards. Bare-root trees can be delivered from mid-November onwards. Within those periods you can specify your preferred month of delivery during the checkout process. It is best to order as soon as you can to ensure items are reserved for you.

*Mature size: Height shown is the approximate height of the tree when mature (after 5-10 years), not the height when supplied. See photos of trees as supplied. Actual mature heights may vary considerably dependent on your local conditions and training and pruning regime.

Stock availability: Items showing as 'sold out' will probably be available again next season. Click here to be notified when we get more trees of this variety.

Alternatives to Queen Cox apple trees

Summary features of Queen Cox

Growing

  • Gardening skill: Some needed?
  • Cropping: Light
  • Fertility: Self-fertile?
  • Flowering group: 3?
  • Pollinating others: Poor?
  • Ploidy: Diploid?
  • Vigour: Weak growing?
  • Precocity: Precocious?
  • Bearing regularity: Regular?
  • Fruit bearing: Spur-bearer?
  • Fruit persistence: Normal ripening?
  • Overall disease resistance: Poor?
  • Canker: Some susceptibility?
  • Scab: Some susceptibility?
  • Mildew: Some susceptibility?
  • Cedar apple rust: Some susceptibility?

Uses

Identification

  • Country of origin: United Kingdom
  • Period of origin: 1950 - 1999
  • Fruit colour: Orange / Red
  • Blossom colour: White
  • Leaf colour: Green
  • Popularity: Under-rated?

Climate

  • Frost resistance: Susceptible?
  • Temperate climates
  • Planting position: Full sun preferred

Pollination guide for Queen Cox

Queen Cox is in flowering group 3. Queen Cox is self-fertile and does not need a pollination partner, although fruiting may be improved if there is a compatible tree of a different variety nearby. Since it flowers in the middle of the blossom season it can be pollinated by most other apple trees.

How to grow Queen Cox apple trees

Queen Cox is a reliably self-fertile form of Cox's Orange Pippin.

Queen Cox is a poor pollinator of other apple varieties, partly because many are related to Cox, and partly because its self-fertility seems to reduce the viability of the pollen for cross-pollination.

In other respects growing Queen Cox means dealing with the same challenges as the original. It prefers a drier climate, and disease-resistance is only average.

Historical details

Queen Cox was raised from a self-fertile form of the original Cox's Orange Pippin at the Long Ashton research station near Bristol, England in the 1970s. It is possible the scion material for this development was propagated from a naturally-occurring bud-sport of Cox's Orange Pippin found in an orchard in Berkshire in the 1950s, although the Berkshire form is not self-fertile. The Long Ashton Queen Cox was originally known as SF18.

Botanical name

Malus domestica 'Queen Cox'


UK-grown trees All our trees are grown in the UK.