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Tai-haku ornamental cherry trees

Prunus serrulata
Tai-haku has received the RHS Award of Garden Merit
  • Best seller
  • Flowering month: April
  • Blossom colour: White
  • Awards: RHS AGM (current) 1993
  • Awards: RHS AM 1931
A traditional Japanese flowering cherry, known as the "Great White Cherry" and notable for its very large single white flowers.

Tai-haku ornamental cherry trees for sale

Pot-grown

All pot-grown trees are suitable for planting out in the garden, some are suitable for growing in containers.

  • PG12-year 12L pot-grown tree Semi-vigorous rootstock £70.00
    Large tree (3m-5m after 10 years)
    Out of stock
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Bare-root

  • BR11-year bare-root tree Semi-vigorous rootstock £46.50
    Large tree (3m-5m after 10 years)
    Out of stock
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Delivery charges

Delivery for a single tree starts at £9.95. It is calculated when you add trees to your basket, based on your postcode.

Taihaku or Tai-Haku, is a traditional white-flowered Japanese flowering cherry.

It is notable for its very large single white flowers, probably the largest of any flowering cherry. It is sometimes known as the "Great White Cherry" for this reason.

As well as the stunning spring blossom display, Tai-Haku also has attractive dark bark, and the leaves turn yellow-orange in autumn.

How to grow

Tai-Haku is a versatile tree for the larger garden, it grows rapidly into a medium-large spreading tree. However do not be put off by its reputation for getting larger and larger - we graft the tree on to a cherry rootstock which will keep the mature height down to around 4m-5m, while retaining its beautiful proportions.

Advice on fruit tree pollination.

History

Tai-haku is a form of Prunus serrulata, which is the traditional Japanese garden cherry ("sato-zakura"). Surprisingly it died out in its native country, but in the 1930s the English flowering cherry enthusiast Major Colllingwood Ingram discovered a tree growing in a garden south of London, and identified it from an 18th century Japanese painting. This remarkable piece of botanical detective work cemented Collingwood Ingram's place as the foremost expert of his generation, in both the west and in Japan. All modern examples of this important variety are descended from the English tree.

Tai-haku characteristics

Growing

  • Gardening skillBeginner

Problems

  • Disease resistanceGood

Identification

  • Country of originJapan
  • Period of origin1700 - 1749
  • Flowering monthApril
  • Blossom colourWhite
  • AwardsRHS AGM (current)RHS AM