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Honeycrisp apple trees

Honeycrisp is a very attractive high quality dessert apple with a predominantly sweet flavour. It lives up to its name - it is a remarkably crisp apple and we think is one of the best new apples of the late 20th century.

Unusually for a modern American apple, Honeycrisp has some balancing acidity to its flavour that will appeal to European tastes. If you like a crisp, light-textured apple with a sweet but tangy flavour, Honeycrisp is worth a try.

The apples are medium-to-large in size, with a light green/yellow background largely covered with red-orange flush occasionally with a hint of pink. They keep well in storage, and retain their crispness.

Honeycrisp is also highly disease-resistant, making it a good choice for organic growers.

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Honeycrisp apple trees for sale

Pot-grown

All pot-grown trees are suitable for planting out in the garden, some are suitable for growing in containers.

  • PG12-year bush-trained 12L pot-grown tree M26 rootstock £39.50
    Medium tree (2m-3m after 10 years)
    Out of stock
  • PG22-year bush-trained 12L pot-grown tree MM106 rootstock £39.50
    Large tree (3m-4m after 10 years)
    Out of stock

Bare-root

  • BR11-year bare-root tree M26 rootstock £19.95
    Medium tree (2m-3m after 10 years)
    Out of stock
  • BR21-year bare-root tree MM106 rootstock £19.95
    Large tree (3m-4m after 10 years)
    Out of stock

How to grow

Honeycrisp is considered one of the most disease-resistant modern apples in the USA. Our first UK trials were in the dreadful rain-soaked 2012 season, and Honeycrisp sailed through with a heavy crop of high quality apples which looked and tasted just like US-grown ones. The only blemish on its record in the UK is a suspectibility to mildew, which might worry commercial growers but is not likely to be an issue for gardeners.

Honeycrisp was also developed to withstand the cold winters of North America - Canadian researchers have found it can survive temperatures as low as -35C - so it is quite at home throughout the UK and potentially a good choice for very cold situations.

Having said that, we think it probably grows better in areas with reasonable amounts of sunshine.

It is a good idea to let Honeycrisp trees reach their full size before allowing cropping to begin, so remove any fruitlets that might form in the early years.

Advice on fruit tree pollination.

History

Honeycrisp was introduced in the 1990s by the University of Minnesota. It is related to Keepsake and more distantly to Northern Spy, a traditional American cold-hard apple variety. The apples are sometimes available in European supermarkets as Honeycrunch.

Honeycrisp characteristics

Growing

  • Gardening skillBeginner
  • Self-fertilityNot self-fertile
  • Flowering group4
  • Pollinating othersAverage
  • Fruit bearingSpur-bearer
  • Climate suitabilityTemperate climatesMild damp climatesWarm climates

Using

  • Picking seasonLate
  • CroppingGood
  • Keeping (of fruit)3 months or more
  • Food usesEating fresh
  • Flavour style (apples)Sweeter

Problems

  • Disease resistanceGood
  • ScabVery resistant
  • MildewSome susceptibility

Climate

    Identification

    • Country of originUnited States
    • Period of origin1950 - 1999
    • Fruit colourOrange / Red