Pear trees

We have an extensive range of pear trees and can advise on choosing the best pear trees for your garden or orchard project.
Baronne de Mello pear tree
Late-season  (3)  
Eat  |  Sold out

A high-quality dessert pear, developed by the famous 19th century Belgian enthusiast Van Mons. compare
Beth pear tree
Early-season  (3)  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
An easy and reliable early-season pear, with a very good melting flavour. compare
Beurre Bosc pear tree
Late-season  (5)  
Eat | Cook  |  Sold out

A traditional French pear with buttery melting flesh. compare
Beurre Hardy pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

A classic French pear with a very good flavour, but grows best in a warm sheltered situation. compare

Late-season  (4)  
Eat | Cook  |  Sold out

A traditional French 19th century pear, widely considered one of the best for flavour. compare
Black Worcester pear tree
Very late-season  (3)  
Cook  |  In stock

The oldest true English pear, 16th century or earlier. Ideal for stewed pears. compare
Catillac pear tree
Late-season  (3)  
Cook  |  In stock

A very old French culinary pear, dating back to the reign of Louis XIV. compare
Clapp's Favourite pear tree
Early-season  (4)  
Eat | Cook  |  In stock

An attractive red-flushed early-season American pear. compare
Concorde pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
A marriage of Conference and Comice - Concorde is easy to grow, heavy crops, excellent flavour. compare
Conference pear tree
Late-season  (3)  SF  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
A popular and reliable English pear, Conference is perfectly suited to the English climate. compare
Doyenne du Comice pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
Doyenne du Comice is arguably the best flavoured of all pears. compare
Durondeau pear tree
Late-season  (3)  
Eat  |  In stock

An attractive Belgian pear from the early 19th century, with a good sweet flavour. compare
Fondante d'Automne pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

An old fashioned French pear with a notably sweet flavour. compare
Glou Morceau pear tree
Late-season  (2)  
Eat  |  In stock

A traditional 18th century Belgian pear with a notably rich sweet flavour. compare
Gorham pear tree
Mid-season  (4)  SF  
Eat | Cook  |  Sold out

A reliable early 20th century American pear, with a sweet creamy flesh. compare

Late-season  (3)  
Eat | Cook  |  In stock

Humbug is an unusual pear variety, the fruits have distinctive green and yellow stripes. compare
Invincible pear tree
Mid-season  (2)  
Eat  |  In stock

Invincible is a good-flavour pear which can cope with more difficult conditions than most pears. compare
Josephine de Malines pear tree
Very late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

A classic 19th century winter pear with a high quality flavour. compare
Louise Bonne of Jersey pear tree
Mid-season  (2)  
Eat  |  In stock

An attractive red-flushed French pear variety with sweet melting flesh. compare
Merton Pride pear tree
Mid-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

One of the best English pears, with a notably juicy buttery flesh. compare
Moonglow pear tree
Early-season  (3)  
Eat | Cook  |  In stock

A high quality early season dessert and culinary pear, very resistant to fireblight. compare
Obelisk pear tree
Late-season  (3)  SF  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
A useful dwarf pear tree for small gardens, it grows with a tidy columnar habit and is self-fertile. compare
Onward pear tree
Mid-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

Onward is high quality dessert pear, related to Doyenne du Comice but easier to grow. compare
Packham's Triumph pear tree
Late-season  (3)  
Eat  |  In stock

Perhaps the best known Australian pear, producing large quantities of small but sweet-flavoured pears. compare
Seckel pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat | Cook  |  Sold out

A small but exceptionally sweet red American pear from the 18th century. compare
Sensation pear tree
Early-season  (3)  
Eat  |  In stock

A red-coloured sport of the popular Williams pear, with a similar good flavour. compare
Williams pear tree
Early-season  (3)  
Eat  |  In stock

Best seller
Williams is a classic English pear, also known as Bartlett, with good flavour and quite easy to grow. compare
Winter Nelis pear tree
Late-season  (4)  
Eat  |  In stock

A late-season dessert pear from Belgium, with an excellent sweet flavour. compare

More about Pear trees

Pears are related to apples, and most of the horticultural requirements and challenges of apples apply also to growing pear trees. However pear trees are a bit more demanding than apple trees - they prefer slightly warmer conditions and are a bit less tolerant of soil and situation, and crop yields are lower.

On the plus side, pear trees are less susceptible to the various pests and diseases commonly experienced with apples.

When it comes to flavour, pears have an aura of exclusivity which you don't tend to find in apples.

Although there are some culinary pear varieties, all the ones we offer are dessert pears - good for eating fresh, but also useful for culinary purposes too.

Unlike apples, pears cannot be ripened on the tree. This is because pears ripen from the inside out, so by the time it looks ripe the flesh will actually be over-ripe. The time to pick is when the pears are still hard, but the stalk snaps readily from the branch with little effort. Then, put the newly-picked pears straight into a fridge - allow a day or so for summer pears, and 3-4 weeks for the longest-keeping winter pears. Finally, place them in a fruit bowel and allow them about a week to ripen to perfection. Oregon State University has a very good article on how pears ripen.

Pears are fundamentally self-sterile so will require a pollination partner, in other words a compatible pear tree of a different variety growing nearby. Even the varieties we list as self-fertile will be far more productive with a pollination partner. Conference is probably the most reliably self-fertile pear.

Most European and Asian pears are genetically compatible and therefore capable of cross-pollination, but most Asian pears flower earlier than European ones so in practice cross-pollination is not usually reliable. European pears and Perry pears are however compatible and flowering times usually overlap. Conversely, the various ornamental pears such as Chanticleer, do not seem to be good pollinators of fruiting pears.

Most pear varieties are supplied on quince rootstocks. These help keep the size under control but they are very demanding of water during the spring, and regular watering is very important for the successful establishment of new pear trees.